Employer Questions Interview Body Language Tips For Job

When the interviewer comes to the room to meet you, do not offer your hand for a handshake unless the interviewer offers his hand. Shake hands firmly, but do not squeeze. Maintain eye contact.

Body posture is important during job interviews and you can adopt the following stance. At the beginning of the interview, sit up straight in your chair, with your back leaning against the back of the chair. Do not slouch or move sideways in your chair because it might be perceived by the interviewer as a lack of interest or boredom. On the other hand, sitting on the edge of your chair can impart a message that you are a little nervous and that you feel uneasy with the situation.

When the interviewer says something, it is advisable to lean forward a little. This shows interest and attention in what the interviewer is saying. You can tilt your head a little to show that you are listening closely.

Do not cross your arms because this might be perceived as a defensive move. Just place your hands loosely on your lap or just put them on the armrest of your chair. By doing this, you will also be able to make hand movements to support what you are saying.

While speaking, you may nod your head occasionally to expound on a subject or to give more meaning to what you are saying. Hand movements can also help to spice up the conversation. The interviewer would think that you are comfortable with the interview process if you make hand gestures.

Too much hand movements at the beginning of the interview may not be a good idea. The proper way is to add them gradually throughout the interview.

Be aware of your interviewer’s hand movements as well. If they use their hands a lot to make a point or to clarify something, you can do the same thing as well (Remember mirroring?). When they don’t make many movements, do the same thing as them. It is important to adjust your gestures to that of the interviewer to establish rapport.

Be alert to unintentional gestures that you may make sometimes due to tension. Some of the acts that may irritate the interviewer could include:

  • Tapping your fingers across the desk.
  • Shuffling your feet.
  • Biting your nails.
  • Toying with a pen.

Gone are the days when the job seeker has to write the handwritten application letter to earn that job interview. In this age of computers and cyber technology, most employers prefer applicants who apply online, and more job seekers are looking to the net for their job opportunities. But one thing remains the same – the body language of the applicant during job interviews and how they make the first impression as they step inside that interview room.

Based on your body language, an interviewer may know whether you are confident or not, if you are the shy type or the friendly type, if you are a loner or a team player, or even if you are telling the truth or not. They can tell if you are capable of handling the job, if you are devoted, or if you’re someone who can get along with other employees. Based on their questions, the interviewer will not only pay attention to what you say, but also on how you say it. The interviewer generally will find responses from you that match their qualifications. How you can decode the body language of your interviewer in relation to your own body language will determine the thin line if you get that job or not.

This is the most important aspect of the job interview – arriving on time. The job interview is deemed as a very important appointment, and being late is a cardinal crime with gravity that may cause you to lose that job opportunity. Your attitude regarding time will send the wrong messages to the employer, and will tell a lot about your lack of professionalism. Being stuck in traffic is a very lame and downright unforgivable excuse. It is better to be early by one hour than to be a minute late.

Being interviewed by one person could be a piece of cake for many. But being interviewed by a group could be a confusing ordeal, especially when it comes to who you should look at during the interview.

It is important to maintain eye contact with all the interviewers at an equal extent. By looking uniformly at them, you will establish their trust and you will gain composure throughout the interview process.

When one of the interview partners asks or says something, maintain eye contact with him until he ceases speaking. This will indicate that you’re listening attentively. While he is speaking, he may also look at the other interviewers. When he looks at you again, you can nod your head to encourage him to continue speaking.

When you answer a question, look first at the one who asked. But while you are answering, you should take turns looking at each of the other interviewers as well. You should direct yourself again to the person who asked the question when you want to prove a point, when you want to emphasize something, and when you are done answering.

Observing the body language of your interviewers is as important as being aware of your own body movements. The body gestures of your interviewers can give you an indication of how well you are coming across to them. This can serve as a signal to change your approach at an early stage before they give you the thumbs down.

For example, when you did something that displeases the interviewers, they will show their annoyance through body language. When they sigh, shake their heads, look down, or fold their arms and lean back, you can take this as a sign of discontentment or irritability. The interviewers might not consciously notice that they’re exhibiting their body movements at first, so you still have a chance to shift your strategy.

Knowing how to act confidently using body language can increase your chances of passing the interview. You can utilize this knowledge to conceal your anxiety a little, but this is something you shouldn’t worry about too much. Many applicants are tensed during an interview, and they would not want to let the interviewer know about their inner feelings. However, it is completely understandable to be nervous at this stage. It is completely normal.

Your nervousness may even indicate how valuable getting this job is to you. If you weren’t nervous, and you act like a happy-go-lucky person, you might be perceived as someone who is not very interested in the job.

The interview not only functions as a way of determining who among the applicants is most capable of performing the job well, but it is also a means of allowing the interviewer to get to know more about the applicants. It’s a first encounter with an individual that you might soon work together with. If that’s the case, then the interviewer (who could be your boss) should actually feel the same way as you are. Nervousness often accompanies excitement.

Communication occurs constantly in a meeting. Not many people are involved in speaking, but almost everyone (if not everyone) would exhibit body language signals that divulge what they are actually feeling inside.

If you are the leader of the meeting, it is important to know if the attendees are interested in what you are saying, or if they agree with your ideas. Early detection of boredom or disagreement is crucial in order for you to change your approach or present a different proposal when necessary.

When you see most of the attendees reclining back in their chairs or just staring blankly without blinking an eye, it likely means they are not interested in the topic being discussed. Do not prolong the discussion or do something that will break the monotony.

When the attendees nod constantly, it means they are agreeing with what you are saying.

When the attendees cross their arms, touch their nose or mouth, sit back, and worse, shake their heads, they oppose your ideas. Time to think of some countermeasures to neutralize the situation.

When an attendee breathes deeply, it probably means that he wants to interrupt the conversation and express his point of views.

Observe also other body gestures, such as:

  • Changing the intonation of the voice.
  • Frowning.
  • Looking down at the ground
  • Drumming fingers in the table.
  • Exiting the meeting room.

You need to detect the inner feelings of each attendee and bear in mind how this can affect the reaction of the other attendees. If the topic being discussed becomes “too hot to handle,” it might be better to re-schedule the meeting at another time. Some emotional people can exhibit great facial expressions and body gestures. Recognizing them early in the meeting can prevent any undesirable emotional outbreak to occur.

Erik Creed has been teaching single men the secrets on what attracts women to men since 1998. You can learn more by going to Erik Creeds website: 
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