Electrify Your Home For Nothing!

Do you realize that you can get rid of part or all of your electricity bill by assembling your own, low-cost permanent magnet generator? There is zero expense to produce electrical current this way, even though the apparatus requires some electricity to keep it spinning up to speed. The apparatus even generates its own power for that. After it is functioning at full speed, it needs no outside electricity at all to keep it spinning perpetually. Actually, these machines are capable of producing around five times the current they consume to keep functioning.

How much do the parts cost to put together a permanent magnet generator? The cost may astound you: Between one hundred and five hundred dollars, depending on the size of the permanent magnetic generator and, even better, the parts are easily obtainable just about anywhere. You can get them at your nearby hardware or home improvement store.

Complete schematics, parts lists and instructions are currently accessible for a very low price, often less than $50. These directions are so trouble-free to work from that just about any person can easily construct a permanent magnet generator without help. After you have built one or two for yourself, it is easy to begin a money-making venture centered on making these generators for the public. If you end up producing more electric power than you can make use of and if you are still connected to city power, you can sell the surplus back to the electric company when your meter operates backwards.

Permanent magnet generators are pollution-free and emit no toxic fumes. They are not noisy and don’t need much room. You might even locate one inside a city apartment to cut your electricity bill to nothing. Some people construct small permanent magnet generators to furnish part of their power needs, thus shrinking their monthly invoice from the electric power company. Others put together bigger permanent magnet generators that can deliver around 7000 watts, enough to electrify a small house. If you require even more electricity, you can easily harness the output of 2 or more machines together to create any quantity of free electrical current.

To give you a concept of what seven thousand watts of current can power, I own a sixteen hundred square foot dwelling in Hawaii that has been completely run on solar power since 1999. It has an array of forty solar panels, each with an output of 75 watts. 40 x 75 watts = 3000 watts. With just three thousand watts (and a battery bank), I can use my computer and refrigerator all day, cook my meals in a microwave oven and use a toaster. At night, I can watch 1 or 2 DVD’s while powering a small TV and a surround sound system. I keep the lights switched off when not needed. All light bulbs are the fluorescent type.

In the summer, when the Hawaiian sun shines brightly from dawn to dusk, I do not even need to consider how much electricity I am utilizing. In the winter, when the days are shorter and when there are more gray days, I have to turn off the main power switch before I go to bed and turn it back on at daybreak. The electrical refrigerator just “coasts” all night and the food is still reasonably cold in the morning. Where I run into run into difficulty is if I have to deal with an all-day overcast for 2 or more consecutive days. Then, I need to use a back-up three thousand-watt gasoline generator to keep the house operating and the solar batteries charged. This happens perhaps three to four times a winter and hardly ever in the summer.

A permanent magnet generator, unlike a solar system or a wind turbine, can operate twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week and it generates the identical amount of power day and night, rain or shine. You can make use of it to run a battery bank, like solar (but around the clock) or you can easily eliminate the costly, high-maintenance batteries and drive your breaker panel directly. I could use a permanent magnet generator to replace my gasoline solar backup generator. I did not know about permanent magnet generators in 1999 when I paid over $30,000 to create my solar electric system. I will soon need to replace the six giant solar batteries which will cost another $14,000.

Similar to an electric motor, a permanent magnet generator contains moving parts, so it does need a certain, small amount of periodic maintenance due to wear and tear. A permanent magnet generator, running constantly should last at least ten years. And, when it finally does wear out, the cost of building (or rebuilding) a replacement is very low, as has already been discussed.

A permanent magnet generator operates on the principle of attracting and repelling magnetic poles. An array of permanent magnets drives a flywheel which, in turn, spins a generator. In short, it uses magnets and magnetic force to produce perpetual electricity. It will continue functioning, even in extreme heat or below-freezing temperatures.

If you are thinking that all of this is too good to be true, just know that hundreds of these permanent magnet generators have already been made, around the world, and most of them are functioning very well. What better proof could you require?

© 2011 Robert M. Gillespie, Jr.

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