Benefits of Venison – A Natural Fat Burning Food!

Discover the incredible weight loss benefits of venison, how to best prepare it and how much you should eat to get maximum benefit from venison – one of nature’s amazing fat burning foods.

Venison or game meat encompasses elk and moose as well as deer. While they are harder to find, caribou and antelope are also forms of venison.

Venison is hard to come by if you are not a hunter, but you might find it in a specialty market. If you have a hunter in the family, this could also be a source of venison. You may at least get to enjoy a meal or two featuring this meat that is both delicious and nutritious and great support for your fat burning regimen.

Deer meat has a deep, full flavor and a tender, yet supple, texture. Deer can be hunted wild, or they may be raised on a farm. The flavor of the meat depends upon the diet of the animal. A deer that has foraged will taste different than a domestic deer. In any case, deer meat has an awesome flavor.

Fat Burning Benefits of Venison

Venison is incredibly low fat. It is very low in saturated fat, and it is also low in calories.

A 3-ounce serving of venison has about 134 calories, 3 grams of fat, and 1 gram of saturated fat. A similar serving of elk meat will yield 124 calories and 2 fat grams – one of those saturated fat. Moose meat contains 114 calories and 1 gram fat, but not any saturated fats.

Here are the benefits you will derive from venison: It is a great source of vitamins B12, B2, B6, and niacin. It also contains the minerals: zinc, selenium, iron, phosphorous, and copper. It is an excellent source of high-quality protein.

Venison contains iron, which is a building block of hemoglobin. This is what makes it possible for your blood to transport oxygen from your lungs throughout your body. Additionally, hemoglobin is an essential part of the enzyme systems that regulate metabolism and the production of energy.

Venison contains B vitamins (that is, B12 and B6), which assist in keeping homocysteine levels from becoming unhealthily high.

Here are the dangers of high levels of homocysteine:
The worsening of diabetic heart disease or atherosclerosis.
Damage to blood vessels that can lead to a heart attack or a stroke.

Osteoporosis and colon cancer may be prevented with the consumption of vitamin B12, which works to protect the colon against carcinogens.

Venison contains a good supply of Vitamin B2 (riboflavin). This vitamin helps with promoting a steady supply of oxygen based energy to your body. This is especially useful for the heart and muscles of the body. The protein like antioxidant molecule known as glutathione must be recycled constantly. Riboflavin helps to protect this delicate molecule.

Venison contains niacin to combat the incidence of osteoporosis. It also produces starch in the liver and muscles that can converted into energy.

Preparing Venison

When you choose your venison (deer meat) try to find meat from younger deer. It should be dark with flesh that is finely grained and fat that is clean and white. Fat is the source of the real taste. Look at the recommended sell-by date to find fresh venison in stores. Venison can be purchased in the freezer section or as fresh meat.

You’ll need to trim any fat off the deer, elk, or moose before you grill or broil it.

Venison is very vulnerable and perishable, thus it is vital to place it in the coldest section of your fridge right away. When you plan to use it within a couple days, keep it in its wrapper to reduce handling. If you can’t use it right away, be sure to wrap it properly for the freezer (using aluminum foil or freezer paper) and freeze it promptly. It won’t spoil for a minimum of three to six months.

Exercise caution as you handle raw venison, being sure to rinse any utensils completely. When you marinate your venison, be sure to keep it in the refrigerator. If you leave it out, it is sure to spoil, as it is very heat sensitive. Frozen venison should be thawed out in the fridge.

One excellent way to enjoy venison is simply as a steak or on kabobs. You can also make venison jerky. It can be substituted for many other meats such as turkey or beef in stew or lasagna.

Here are some ways to enjoy elk meat: Chili, meat loaf, roast, stew, burgers, barbecue, or slow cooked in the crock pot.

Here are some ways to enjoy moose meat: Kabobs, hoagies, roast, meatballs, stroganoff, or stew.

Recommended Serving Size

A typical portion of venison is about 3 or 4 ounces per person.

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